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This Is Just For Me

Zen & The Art Of Teaching

Uncommonly Insightful
Uncommonly Insightful

William Glasser suggests this is the way we learn, and more importantly, retain information, yet his ideas, which focus on personal choice, personal responsibility and personal transformation, are considered controversial by mainstream psychiatrists.

What all of us can consider not controversial, is the simple fact that we are born, we live and learn, and then we die.

What and how we do it, and the impact we make, is up to us. Period.

Next Blog.

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This Is Just For Me

Pills Or Stairs?

Palm Springs Hotel
Palm Springs Hotel

“A man’s health can be judged by which he takes two at a time – pills or stairs.”Karen Irizarry

Our attitude, our mental responsibility – what we watch, read, listen to, who we hang out with, our language.

Simple choice. Seek positive outcomes (against the odds) or dwell on things and people that bring us down.

Lane 8, the Next Blog, has the same approach, but for our body.

PS. Lorie Sheffer returns tomorrow.

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This Is Just For Me

Are You One Of These People?

You know the type. They talk about the past. About things younger people can’t even comprehend:

  • When you had to touch the TV to change channels
  • When nothing was electronic
  • When every phone was attached to a cord
  • About how challenging work was when you first started
Categories
This Is Just For Me Would Your Life Change?

We Are Most Beautiful When…

We are most beautiful when we are our authentic selves.

And we know this intuitively.

Counter-intuitively, we often try to be what we think other’s want us to be, or what we think other’s think we are.

But not today:

(next blog)

Categories
This Is Just For Me Would Your Life Change?

Mid Life Workaholics

“Workaholics commit slow suicide by refusing to allow the child inside them to play”. Dr. Lawrence Susser

Recognizing the intense desire to do a good job, many people still have a challenging time overcoming mid life work addiction.

My Grandfather worked full-time, plus he ran a TV repair business out of his basement.  This was back in the day when Televisions were heavy and huge.  He had to travel to people’s homes.  This traveling and the work required to repair TV’s in the basement, plus the travel to return the TV, must have made his work commitment enormous.

My Dad worked 5 1/2 days every single week at the Paper Mill.  On Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, he taught 30-minute drum lessons in our living room – from 4pm until 8pm.  On Friday and Saturday nights, he played drums in a band – weddings, anniversaries, clubs, etc.

Now it’s my turn. Working at a Fortune 100 Company, there is no shortage of work to be done. And I’ve done it willingly for several decades.  Now, I’m also working on my retirement business – to help raise enough money to find a cure for our son’s Crohn’s disease.

The difference, I perceive, is that I have found creative ways to be part of our son’s life.  But only after I squandered the first four decades of my life.